Idaho Grass Seed

Best Lawn Grass Seeds For Idaho

Click Name To View Grass Seed Choice   Type Applications
Buffalo Grass - Buffalo Supreme Warm Season Lawns - High Drought Tolerance - Full Sun
Only Southern Idaho
Zoysia Grass - Zenith Warm Season Lawns - Mostly Sunny to Full Sun - Very Dense Grass
Only Southern Idaho
Zoysia Grass - Compadre Warm Season Lawns - Mostly Sunny to Full Sun - Very Dense Grass
Only Southern Idaho
Cool Season Mix - Showtime Cool Season Lawns - Full Sun to Moderate Shade
Rye, Kentucky Bluegrass, Fine Fescue Mix
Cool Season Mix - Garland Cool Season Lawns - Full Sun to Moderate Shade
Rye, Fine Fescue Mix
Fescue/Bluegrass Mix - Combat Extreme North Cool Season Lawns - Wear Tolerant
Fescue/Hybrid Bluegrass Mix - Combat Extreme South Cool Season Lawns - Wear Tolerant - Extra Heat Tolerance
Fescue Blend - Combat Extreme Transition Cool Season Lawns - Wear Tolerant
Fine Fescue Blend - Legacy Cool Season Lawns - Full Sun To Moderate Shade
Kentucky Bluegrass - Bluegrass Supreme Cool Season Lawns - Golf Gourses - Full Sun
Kentucky Bluegrass - Midnight Cool Season Lawns - Golf Courses - Full Sun
OSP Ryegrass Cool Season Lawns - Golf Courses
Shade Grass - Poa Supina Mix Cool Season Lawns - Full Sun - Deep Shade - Best Shade Grass

Grasses used in Idaho consist of cool-season and warm-season grasses. Cool-season grasses can withstand Idaho's cold winters and perform well under most conditions. These grasses are not commonly grown in Idaho because their performance is not as satisfactory as most cool season grasses. Warm season grasses go dormant, turn tan or brown with the first frost, and stay that way until the weather warms. In southern Idaho, experiments are being conducted to test their extreme drought tolerance. Warm season grasses include buffalo grass and zoysia grass for Southern Idaho.

Cool-Season Grasses:
Perennial ryegrass - Turf-type perennial ryegrasses germinate and establish very rapidly. They are extremely wear tolerant, producing beautiful lawns that do not form thatch. Ryegrasses blend well with other grasses and add disease and insect resistance to bluegrass mixes. Ryegrass leaves are fibrous, requiring a sharp mower blade to avoid shredding or tearing the turf. Like Kentucky bluegrass, ryegrasses require moderate to high fertility levels.

Fine fescues - Fine fescues include creeping red fescue, chewings fescue, and hard fescue. Fescues have the finest leaves of any lawn grass. They perform best in shady lawns in mixtures with shade-tolerant Kentucky bluegrasses. These grasses are excellent for overseeding poor lawns to improve turf quality. In mixtures with other grasses, they add disease resistance to the turf. Fine fescues are adapted to well-drained, infertile soils. Often they are grown on slopes and left unmowed to create a meadow effect. Their fertilization requirements are low to moderate. The creeping red fescues have a spreading or rhizomatous root system that will easily cover open soil areas to create a lawn. The chewings fescues are bunchgrasses that do not spread. They should be planted thickly enough to ensure a dense and even turf. The hard fescues are also bunch-type, make excellent turf, have extensive root systems, and are drought tolerate.

Tall fescue - Turf Type - These grasses are well adapted to a wide range of soil conditions. Tall fescues tolerate heat and drought better than most cool season turfgrasses due to their deep root systems (4 to 6 feet). Fescues can withstand traffic and heavy use and are often used on football and other playing fields. The new turf-type tall fescues, especially the new dwarf varieties are thinner bladed than older varieties. Since fescues do not spread by stolons or rhizomes (except newer types), they do not form thatch. Fescues are usually planted as a monoculture (a pure stand of a single species). They do not accept low mowing. Their fertility requirements are low to moderate

Kentucky bluegrass - This is probably the most traditionally used cool season grass. Monocultures of Kentucky bluegrasses are not recommended in Southern Idaho because of insect and disease problems. Bluegrasses, however, may be a part of most grass mixtures. Bluegrasses are slow to germinate and establish. They are good at repairing damaged turf areas because of their ability to spread. This can be a problem when flower beds border turf areas. Bluegrasses have a moderate to high fertility requirement.

Warm-Season Grasses:
Buffalograss - These warm season stoloniferous grasses, due to their drought resistance, are becoming popular in the West, even in cool season areas. Buffalograsses are resistant to heat and drought. They are well adapted to a wide range of soils, but especially to alkaline conditions and soils of low fertility. Buffalograsses are slow to establish (1 to 3 years) and they require infrequent mowing. Like most warm season grasses, they have a short growing season (4 to 5 months) in the north due to their inability to withstand cold weather. Hence, during half the year or more in Idaho, a buffalograss lawn will be tan or brown in color.

Zoysiagrass - Zoysia grass can be very cold tolerant; however, it has a very short growing season. Zoysiagrass is adapted to a wide range of soil conditions but grows best on well-drained, slightly acidic soils of medium texture and fertility. Although it is quite tolerant of drought, heat, and cold stress, like most of the warm season grasses, it is slow to green up in spring and late season discoloration begins at 50F to 55F. Zoysia is slow to establish. The density and toughness of the grass blades may require a heavy, reel mower.

Below is the USDA Zone Map for Idaho so you can determine which zone you reside in. Below that are our picks for your state which will do best in your area. Next on this page are tables which list various grasses and their characteristics so you can compare before you decide on your purchase. Click on the product name (ie. Midnight) for more information about that grass and to make your purchase.

USDA Zone Map For Idaho
Idaho Grass Seed Idaho Zones

Compare Various Grasses For Their Characteristics
Cool Season
Grasses
Leaf
Texture
Establish
Rate
Nitrogen
Use
Water
Use
Drought
Tolerance
Salinity
Tolerance
Shade
Tolerance
Bentgrass - Creeping Fine Moderate
to Fast
Low to
Moderate
High Poor to
Moderate
High Poor to
Moderate
Bentgrass - Colonial Fine Moderate
to Fast
Low Moderate Poor to
Moderate
Moderate Moderate
Bluegrass - Kentucky Moderate
to Fine
Slow Moderate
to High
Moderate
to High
Good Moderate Poor
Bluegrass - Rough Moderate
to Fine
Slow Moderate
to High
Moderate
to High
Poor Moderate Excellent
Fescue - Chewings Fine Moderate Moderate
to Low
Moderate Good
to Excellent
Low Excellent
Fescue - Hard Fine Slow to
Moderate
Low to
Very Low
Moderate Excellent Low to
Moderate
Excellent
Fescue - Creeping Fine Moderate Low to
Moderate
Moderate Good Low Excellent
Fescue - Turf Type Moderate
to Coarse
Moderate Moderate
to High
Low to
Moderate
Excellent Low Good to
Excellent
Ryegrass - Perennial Fine to
Moderate
Very Fast Moderate
to High
Moderate
to High
Good Poor to
Moderate
Poor to
Moderate
Warm Season
Grasses
Leaf
Texture
Establish
Rate
Nitrogen
Use
Water
Use
Drought
Tolerance
Salinity
Tolerance
Shade
Tolerance
Bahiagrass Coarse
toVery Coarse
Slow to
Moderate
Low Low Excellent Excellent Moderate
to Good
Bermudagrass Fine
to Moderate
Moderate
to Fast
Moderate Moderate
to High
Excellent Very Good Poor
Blue Grama Fine
to Moderate
Slow to
Moderate
Low Low Excellent Moderate Very Poor
Buffalograss Moderate
to Coarse
Slow to
Moderate
Low Low Excellent Moderate Very Poor
Carpetgrass Coarse Moderate
to Fast
Low High Low Low Excellent
Centipedegrass Moderate
to Coarse
Slow Low Low Good Moderate Moderate
to Good
Seashore Paspalum Moderate Moderate Moderate Moderate Excellent Excellent Good
Zoysiagrass Fine
to Medium
Slow to
Moderate
Moderate Moderate Excellent Good Moderate
to Good
Compare Various Grasses For Their Characteristics - Continued
Cool Season
Grasses
Fertility
Needs
Wear
Resistance
Mowing
Height
Cold
Tolerance
Acid Soil
Tolerance
Thatching
Tendency
Heat
Tolerance
Bentgrass - Creeping High Low Low Low Medium
to High
High High
Bentgrass - Colonial High Low Low Low Medium
to High
High High
Bluegrass - Kentucky Medium Medium
to High
Medium High Medium Medium Medium
Bluegrass - Rough Medium Medium Medium High Medium Medium Medium
Fescue - Chewings Low Low Medium Medium
to High
Medium
to High
Low to
Medium
Low to
Medium
Fescue - Hard Low Low Medium Medium
to High
Medium
to High
Low to
Medium
Low to
Medium
Fescue - Creeping Low Low Medium High Medium
to High
Low to
Medium
Low to
Medium
Fescue - Turf Type Low to
Medium
Medium
to High
Medium
to High
Medium High Low High
Ryegrass - Perennial Medium High Low to
Medium
Medium Medium Low Medium
to High
Warm Season
Grasses
Fertility
Needs
Wear
Resistance
Mowing
Height
Cold
Tolerance
Acid Soil
Tolerance
Thatching
Tendency
Heat
Tolerance
Bahiagrass Low Medium
to High
High Low Low Medium
to High
High
Bermudagrass Medium High Low to
Medium
Low to
Medium
Medium Medium High
Blue Grama Low Low High High Low Low High
Buffalograss Low Low High High Low Low High
Carpetgrass Low Medium
to High
Low Medium
to High
Medium
to High
High Low
Centipedegrass Low Low Medium
to High
Medium
to High
High Medium High
Seashore Paspalum Medium
to High
Medium
to High
Low Medium Low Medium
to High
High
Zoysiagrass Low to
Medium
Medium
to High
Low to
Medium
High Low to
Medium
Medium
to High
High

BACK TO TOP