Fenugreek Sprouting & Microgreens Herb Seeds For Eating

Fenugreek Seeds

Non GMO
Heirloom
1000 Seeds
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4.99
2000 Seeds
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8.99
1/4 LB
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11.99
1 LB
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19.99

About...

(Trigonella foenum-graecum) - Fenugreek can be used grown as a mature herb or microgreen. Fenugreek seeds are popularly used in spice mixes and teas. Ground Fenugreek seeds are one of the primary ingredients in curry powder. The leaves are also edible, usually braised, and served as a green side dish much like spinach greens. As a microgreen fenugreek has a powerful flavor and a little goes a long way. Read More....

MORE HERB OPTIONS

Fenugreek seeds Coix seeds Toothache plant seeds Valerian seeds Watercress seeds Burdock seeds Sorrel seeds Okra seeds ...More
ABOUT

Growing Guide

SEEDING RATE

1 oz per 10 x 20 Tray
TB seed /1 - 2 Cup Sprouts

GROWING MEDIUMS

Hydroponic or Soil

PRESOAK

4 - 7 Hours

BLACKOUT TIME

2 - 4 Days

SPROUTING METHODS

Tray, Sack or Jar

SPROUTING HARVEST

8 - 11 Days

MICROGREENS HARVEST

12 - 16 Days

BABY GREENS HARVEST

17 - 25 Days

FLAVOR PROFILE

Spicy, Mustardy, Curry

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

AVERAGE GERM TIME

LIGHT REQUIRED

DEPTH

SOWING RATE

MOISTURE

PLANT SPACING

PLANTING & CARE GUIDE

Microgreen Information

NUTRIENTS

Vitamin B, Iron, Magnesium, Calcium, Potassium, Antioxidants

MICROGREEN TEXTURE

Soft, Tender

COMMON USES

Salads, Curries, Vegetable Dishes, Sandwiches, Soups, Stir-fries

Microgreens Planting Guide

Microgreens Planting Methods

Hydroponic & Soil Methods

Step-by-Step Instructions

Harvesting

(Continued From Top) - A legume with clover-shaped leaves, fenugreek microgreens add an unusual flavor to meals. A mainstay in Indian cooking, chhoti or samudra methi as they’re known in India are often paired with potatoes as tasty microgreens. Fenugreek is used as a spice in its seed form and as an herb or green in the leaf form. You might be more familiar with fenugreek as a spice, which is used in curry powder and garam masala. It is easy to grow a fenugreek plant, and even easier to grow and harvest fenugreek microgreens. 


With a taste described as fresh, grassy, spicy, mustardy, and similar to curry powder, fenugreek microgreens can be added to salads, curries, or vegetable dishes. The seeds have a caramel, burnt sugar scent, but the leaves are more subtle and bitter in their taste. You will notice the bitter note at the end. Packing a punch when it comes to nutrition, fenugreek microgreens make a great option for the home microgreen gardener to grow due to their health benefits and the unusual taste they add to a dish. Fenugreek is a good source of vitamins as well as iron. These legumes are nutrient-dense and are a healthy green to add to your food routines.

Fenugreek seeds are easy to grow and the herb plant has nutritional value. This annual is widely cultivated for use as a medicinal herb and as a culinary herb. It has leaves that have 3 lobes and look clover-like, and it produces small cream to yellow colored flowers. It is nicely scented. Fenugreek plants are native to the Mediterranean region. India is a large producer of the herb seeds.

Fenugreek seeds are used as a culinary herb and spice. Some people eat the seeds as you would eat sunflower seeds, but most often Fenugreek seeds are used in making curry. The young, tender leaves can be sprinkled into salads as well. As a medicinal herb, Fenugreek has a long history of use. It is said to relieve sore throats, help with diabetes by acting as a sugar-regulating agent, improve high cholesterol, and it is given to lactating women to increase the production of milk.

How To Grow Fenugreek Herb Seeds: Start Fenugreek seeds directly outdoors after danger of frost has passed. The Fenugreek herb does not transplant well, so it is best to start it in the herb garden or in a container where it will stay. Grow the herb plant in full sun and in rich soil that has had organic matter worked in. Cut the seed pods off the Fenugreek herb plant once they have ripened. Allow the seeds pods to finish drying in the sun and store the herb seeds in airtight containers.

Harvesting: Fenugreek leaves can be harvested at any time from the microgreen or sprout stage to their mature size. When the plant begins to flower, however, the culinary quality of the leaves declines. To store the fresh leaves, wash them carefully and strip them from the stems; store them in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. The leaves can also be dried or frozen.

Note: Our seeds are perfect for growing both indoors and outdoors, allowing you to nurture your own green space regardless of the season. They are versatile, enabling you to germinate plants anytime, anywhere, whether it's inside your home or outside in your garden, opening up new possibilities for your gardening endeavors.


ABOUT

Grass Specifications

SEASON

Perennial

USDA ZONES

9 - 10

HEIGHT

36 - 48 inches

WIDTH

24 inches

FOLIAGE COLOR

Green

SOIL REQUIREMENT

Moist, pH 6.1 - 7.8

ENVIRONMENT

Full sun to partial shade

DEER RESISTANT

Yes

LATIN NAME

Coix Lacryma-jobi

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

70F

AVERAGE GERM TIME

14 - 28 days, soak seed overnight in warm water before planting

LIGHT REQUIRED

Yes

DEPTH

1/4 inch

SOWING RATE

2 - 3 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination occurs

PLANT SPACING

10 - 12 inches

Job's Tears (Coix Lacryma-jobi) - For an interesting ornamental grass, try starting Cois seeds and enjoy this attractive grass that is known for its seeds. Commonly called Job's Tears grass, Coix is a perennial grass only in climate zones 9 and 10, and it is grown as an annual in the cooler zones. Ornamental grasses provide their own unique beauty to the landscape and Job's Tears is no exception with its slender, ribbon-like leaves and spikes of teardrop-like seeds. The plant is well known for the seeds that are natural beads and have been used for centuries to create jewelry and rosaries. Coix grass is native to Asia and is found along roadsides as well as cultivated for the grain that is edible and used in traditional Chinese herbal medicine. Grow these ornamental grass seeds and experience first hand the beauty and uniqueness of this Coix plant!

ABOUT
FAQ’s

Herb Specifications

SEASON

Perennial

USDA ZONES

9 - 11

HEIGHT

18 - 24 inches

BLOOM SEASON

Mid summer to early fall

BLOOM COLOR

Yellow w/ red

ENVIRONMENT

Full sun to partial shade

SOIL TYPE

Prefers moist, but well-drained soils

DEER RESISTANT

Yes

LATIN NAME

Spilanthes Oleracea

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

70F

AVERAGE GERM TIME

7 - 14 days

LIGHT REQUIRED

Yes

DEPTH

Do not cover seed, but press firmly in to soil

SOWING RATE

8 - 10 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination

PLANT SPACING

12 - 15 inches

Toothache Plant (Spilanthes Oleracea) - Start Toothache Plant seeds and grow this helpful and attractive plant in the herb garden! Toothache Plant is a tender perennial that is commonly used to treat toothaches along with other mouth, throat, and gum conditions. The leaves and flowers can be chewed to have a mildly anesthetizing effect. This medicinal herb also has anti-bacterial and anti-fungal properties, and it enhances the immune system. The leaves are often eaten raw and taste good in salads.

Unique yellow blooms

Has ornamental flower heads that are good for cutting, drying, and preserving.

toothache plant

Herb seed | toothache

How to grow

How To Grow Toothache plant From Seed: In areas of frost, grow Toothache Plant seeds as annuals. It prefers full sun or partial shade. Start the herb seeds indoors 4 to 6 weeks before the last expected frost date. Transplant the young plants outside into a prepared site that has had organic compost worked in. Wait until frost danger has passed to plant outside. Once the young Para Cress plants have several sets of mature leaves, pinch back the stems to encourage a more bushy and compact growth.

  • Sowing Rate: 8 - 10 seeds per plant
  • Average Germ Time: 7 - 14 days
  • Mid summer to early fall blooms
  • Attracts bees, butterflies and birds
  • Depth: Do not cover
yellow red flowers

Flower Specifications

The Toothache Plant has reddish-green foliage and tight, compact little pompom flowers that have no petals. The flowers are yellow with a red center, and they resemble an eyeball, so the herb plant is also commonly referred to as Eyeball Plant and Para Cress.

  • Height: 18 - 24 inches
  • USDA Zones: 9 - 11
  • Season: Perennial

Common Questions

Q

Which herbs can thrive in the kitchen?

A

Not all herbs are suitable for indoor growth. Herbs with woody, bushy growth, like rosemary are too large for indoor herb gardens. Consider other more suitable herbs for an indoor kitchen garden, such as chives, oregano, thyme, dill, mint, basil, cilantro, sage and savory. Each herb has specific growing needs, so ensure to provide the right amount of light, humidity, and air circulation. If using a single large container, ensure that all plants require similar amounts of sunlight and water. For instance, chives and cilantro may not need as much sunlight as dill and oregano.

Q

What are good companion plants for herb gardens?

A

Pairing herbs based on watering requirements, like planting lavender with thyme or basil with chives, is ideal for maintaining the health of both plants. Avoid companion planting with catnip, lemon balm and mint as they should be grown in separate pots due to their rapid spreading nature that can overtake other plants in your indoor herb garden.

Q

When do I establish an indoor herb garden?

A

Create a kitchen herb garden by propagating cuttings from your outdoor plants as the weather cools in the fall. If you opt to sow your indoor herb garden from purchased seeds, begin a few weeks before the anticipated first frost of the season. Most herbs can be harvested within a few weeks, so there is no need to plant too far in advance.

Q

Do kitchen herbs need full sun?

A

Most herbs need 6 hours of sunlight a day to thrive. If you do not have this type of light available in your kitchen, consider a grow light that will run 14-16 hours per day 6 to 12 inches above your plants. NOTE: Rotate herbs periodically when grown in windows to let each part of the plant receive sunlight.

Q

What time of year should you plant herbs?

A

Herbs grown in indoor gardens can be planted any time of year. Many gardeners prefer to grow their herbs outdoors during the summer growing season, and then move them to their indoor garden before the first frost of fall. If you prefer to start your seeds outdoors, you will need to wait until after danger of frost in the spring or start your seeds indoors 6 -8 weeks before last frost and transplant in your garden after danger of frost.

Q

Do herbs come back every year?

A

Perennial herbs will come back each year when planted in the correct zone or grown indoors during the cold winter months. Popular perennial herbs are oregano, parsley, sage, fennel, chives, lavender, thyme and mint varieties.

Q

How do I know when my herbs need watered?

A

Allow the soil to dry out just slightly before watering your herbs again. Give your indoor herb garden a dose of diluted water-soluble fertilizer every 2 weeks or so. Too much food will compromise the taste of the herbs. It is also beneficial to provide adequate humidity. If the indoor air is especially dry – which is often the case in regions with cold winters. Set the herbs pots on trays of stones. Fill the trays with water but keep the level below the drainage holes of your pots.

Q

When do I water my outdoor herb garden?

A

Different herb plants will need different amounts of water so keep this in mind when planting your garden and keep similar plants together to simplify watering. Watering is best done in the early morning hours when temperatures are cooler. Many herbs are hardy. They can tolerate soil that is moderately dry. You want to keep an eye out for wilting when the soil is wet. Ideally, your herbs should make quick use of the water you give them. Saturated soil is not what you are after. Pay close attention to the coloration of the leaves on your herbs. Yellow leaves can be a sign of too much water, and so can black leaves. If you spot any mildew or fuzz on the herbs, too much moisture can be the problem.

Q

How do I harvest my herbs?

A

Trim back flowering sections before they bloom for healthier leaves. Prune new growth on young plants weekly to encourage a fuller mature plant. Snip herbs for harvest when they are just a few inches tall. Pruning back the herbs often means a larger, longer harvest. Cut the new growth back at least one per week, even if you are not using the herbs in recipes (see drying and freezing page if you do not want to waste your harvest). Long stems that are about to set flower buds should be trimmed off as they appear.

Q

What do I need to start an indoor herb garden?

A

Common tools needed for an indoor herb garden are: garden trowel, scissors for snipping, stones (optional). Materials for your herbs plants include seed, pots, potting soil, cactus potting soil (optional), pots or trays, fertilizer and a grow light if you do not have adequate sunlight of at least 6 hours per day for your plants.

Q

How do I prepare my containers for planting?

A

Choose large, deep containers with drainage holes to accommodate fast-growing herbs. Fill the container with potting mix leaving about ½ inch clear at the top. Use standard commercial potting soil for most herbs but blend in cactus potting mix for herbs native to the Mediterranean, such as thyme and oregano which prefer dryer soils.

Q

Can I put my indoor herb containers outside?

A

Yes! Move your potted herbs to the patio or deck when the weather warms in the spring and for a boost of sunshine.

Q

How do I know when my herbs need larger containers?

A

When roots begin to emerge through the drainage holes of its container, it is time to repot the herbs. Replace the potting mix; the organic material in the potting mix breaks down over time. Remove any plants with woody or thickened stems and replace them with new seeds or seedlings.

Q

Do herbs need fertilizer?

A

The short answer is yes. However, not all herbs have the same fertilizer needs. Herbs roughly fall into two groups. 1. Slow-growing herbs with small leaves or needles and fibrous, woody stems that are native to the mediterranean where they grow culinary lavender, month, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon and thyme. 2. Fast-growing herbs with larger, thinner leaves. These can be annuals such as basil, borage, cilantro, chervil and dill; bi-annual herbs such as parsley or perennials such as chives. Herbs in the first group generally need less fertilizer than herbs in the second group.

Q

What type of nutrients do herbs need?

A

Start out by planting herbs in healthy soil rich in organic matter. In addition, they will benefit from an organic complete, slow-release fertilizer containing equal amounts of macronutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. A slow-release fertilizer is especially important if your garden has sandy soil because nutrients wash out quickly. To give fast-growing herbs that you harvest often an extra boost, you can also apply fish emulsion, an organic fertilizer that is high in nitrogen, with an NPK ratio of 4-1-1 or 5-1-1.

Q

How often should I fertilize my herbs?

A

The frequency of fertilization follows the growth pattern of the herbs. In soil of average fertility, it is usually sufficient to apply a balanced fertilizer in the spring when they break dormancy, or when the new growing season starts. For other herbs, a light monthly application of a slow-release complete fertilizer should be enough – unless the leaves start to look yellow, which may be a sign of nitrogen deficiency. In that case, applying fish emulsion is a quick fix but before you reach for the fertilizer bottle, rule out that the yellowing of leaves is not caused by something else.

Q

How do I fertilize my herbs in a container?

A

Herbs grown in containers need fertilizer applications more often, because with frequent watering that container plants require, the fertilizer in the potting mix washes out more quickly. Just as with sandy soil, it is important to use slow-release fertilizer. The roots of container plants are in a confined space, unlike herbs grown in the garden or raised beds, which can lead to over fertilization if you are not careful. Organic fertilizers are recommended over synthetic which often contain a high level of salts that can build up in the container over time. To prevent this, it is best to use half the strength of the fertilizer amount specified on the label for any type of fertilizer.

Q

Is it possible to overfertilize herbs?

A

Adding too much fertilizer to herbs usually leads to an excess of nitrogen, which has undesirable results especially for slow-growing herbs. For basil and other thin-leaved herbs, the fast leaf growth induced by nitrogen is fine because you want your plants to be lush. For rosemary and other Mediterranean herbs however, rapid growth means that there is less concentration of essential oils causing the herbs to become less aromatic and have weaker flavor.

Q

How do I prepare garden soil before planting an herb garden?

A

Once you have picked the location for growing your herb garden, you will need to prepare the soil. If the soil is sandy or clay heavy, add plenty of compost. Even if your soil is in pretty good condition, working some compost into the soil will help provide nutrients to the herbs while they are growing.

Q

Can I harvest my herbs too often?

A

Many times, when a new gardener is starting an herb garden, they are afraid that harvesting the herbs frequently will hurt them. The opposite is true. Frequent harvesting of herbs will result in the herb plant producing more and more foliage, which increases the amount you are able to harvest. At the end of the season, you can dry or freeze your herb harvest to enjoy home grown herbs all year long.

Q

I don’t have a good sunny spot outdoors for my herb garden, what can I do?

A

If your yard is mostly shaded, there is not much you can do to change that, but you can pick shade friendly herbs. Parsley, sweet woodruff and mint are good examples of herbs that don’t require as much light. If you are growing plants in low light, manage your expectations. Your herbs will grow but will be slow and results less impressive.

Q

My container soil is staying wet, what do I do?

A

Choose a container that allow for water to drain. If you over water or if it rains too much a good pot will allow the water to flow to the bottom without soaking and rotting the roots of your plants. You can use rocks or pottery shards to fill the bottom of the container to help with drainage. This applies outdoors too. If your herbs constantly have wet feet, they won’t thrive. Either plan when planting your garden and add some sand for drainage or pick plants that don’t mind wet roots as much.

Q

My herbs plants are going to seed, why?

A

The short answer is you are not pruning enough. To prevent rapid growth and encourage a bushy habit, be sure to prune your herb plants regularly. The more you pick off your stems and leaves the longer your herb plant will remain in its production cycle. If you start to see flower heads, snip them right away. When you fail to cut back the plant, it is likely to go to seed and complete its lifecycle. Once that happens, many plants die back. Keep cutting and pinching back flowers to prevent this from happening.

Q

Should I throw away my seeds on their expiration date?

A

Seeds do not have an expiration date, rather they are a sell by date just like food. The dates on seed packages are guidelines to help you know when your seeds are getting old, but it does not mean you need to toss them. Every plant is different. Some seeds last longer than others. Most seeds, if kept cool and dry, will last 2 – 3 years. If you are unsure test them out by growing microgreens.

ABOUT
FAQ’s

Herb Specifications

SEASON

Perennial

USDA ZONES

4 - 9

HEIGHT

20 - 40 inches

BLOOM SEASON

Mid summer

BLOOM COLOR

Pink

ENVIRONMENT

Full sun to partial shade

SOIL TYPE

Rich, moist, well-drained soil

DEER RESISTANT

Yes

LATIN NAME

Valeriana Officinalis

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

65F - 75F

AVERAGE GERM TIME

7 - 21 days

LIGHT REQUIRED

Yes

DEPTH

1/8th inch

SOWING RATE

8 - 10 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination

PLANT SPACING

18 - 36 inches

Valerian (Valeriana Officinalis) - Start Valerian seeds and grow this well-known herb plant. Valerian is highly prized as a medicinal herb. It is a hardy perennial with a history of use dating back to the 16th century. It is very ornamental with fern-like foliage and pink flower heads that attract butterflies. The Valerian herb is also referred to as All Heal and Garden Heliotrope. Valerian plants are an attractive addition to the herb garden, and cats love the herb too. Sometimes, the plants need some protection from cats who might do damage.

The Valerian root is what is harvested for medicinal use. Valerian has been called nature's tranquilizer. It is used to soothe anxiety, relieve pain, and calm minds that cannot fall asleep. In many parts of the world, Valerian root is the standard care for stress and relaxation. It is considered to be very sedating.

How To Grow Valerian From Herb Seeds: Plant Valerian seeds directly outdoors in the spring. Lightly cover the herb seeds with soil and keep moist. The Valerian seedlings are fairly frost tolerant. Start with a prepared seed bed that is weed free and has organic matter worked in. The location should be in full sun to partial shade. Valerian herb plants prefer moist conditions, so provide the equivalent of 1 to 2 inches of rainfall each week. The plant will need nitrogen throughout the growing season. If you are growing Valerian herb plants for the root, cut the flower stalks when they appear. This will direct energy to the roots. Wait until the second year to harvest and dry the roots. Valerian will self-sow. Cut the spent flower heads to prevent re-seeding.

Common Questions

Q

Which herbs can thrive in the kitchen?

A

Not all herbs are suitable for indoor growth. Herbs with woody, bushy growth, like rosemary are too large for indoor herb gardens. Consider other more suitable herbs for an indoor kitchen garden, such as chives, oregano, thyme, dill, mint, basil, cilantro, sage and savory. Each herb has specific growing needs, so ensure to provide the right amount of light, humidity, and air circulation. If using a single large container, ensure that all plants require similar amounts of sunlight and water. For instance, chives and cilantro may not need as much sunlight as dill and oregano.

Q

What are good companion plants for herb gardens?

A

Pairing herbs based on watering requirements, like planting lavender with thyme or basil with chives, is ideal for maintaining the health of both plants. Avoid companion planting with catnip, lemon balm and mint as they should be grown in separate pots due to their rapid spreading nature that can overtake other plants in your indoor herb garden.

Q

When do I establish an indoor herb garden?

A

Create a kitchen herb garden by propagating cuttings from your outdoor plants as the weather cools in the fall. If you opt to sow your indoor herb garden from purchased seeds, begin a few weeks before the anticipated first frost of the season. Most herbs can be harvested within a few weeks, so there is no need to plant too far in advance.

Q

Do kitchen herbs need full sun?

A

Most herbs need 6 hours of sunlight a day to thrive. If you do not have this type of light available in your kitchen, consider a grow light that will run 14-16 hours per day 6 to 12 inches above your plants. NOTE: Rotate herbs periodically when grown in windows to let each part of the plant receive sunlight.

Q

What time of year should you plant herbs?

A

Herbs grown in indoor gardens can be planted any time of year. Many gardeners prefer to grow their herbs outdoors during the summer growing season, and then move them to their indoor garden before the first frost of fall. If you prefer to start your seeds outdoors, you will need to wait until after danger of frost in the spring or start your seeds indoors 6 -8 weeks before last frost and transplant in your garden after danger of frost.

Q

Do herbs come back every year?

A

Perennial herbs will come back each year when planted in the correct zone or grown indoors during the cold winter months. Popular perennial herbs are oregano, parsley, sage, fennel, chives, lavender, thyme and mint varieties.

Q

How do I know when my herbs need watered?

A

Allow the soil to dry out just slightly before watering your herbs again. Give your indoor herb garden a dose of diluted water-soluble fertilizer every 2 weeks or so. Too much food will compromise the taste of the herbs. It is also beneficial to provide adequate humidity. If the indoor air is especially dry – which is often the case in regions with cold winters. Set the herbs pots on trays of stones. Fill the trays with water but keep the level below the drainage holes of your pots.

Q

When do I water my outdoor herb garden?

A

Different herb plants will need different amounts of water so keep this in mind when planting your garden and keep similar plants together to simplify watering. Watering is best done in the early morning hours when temperatures are cooler. Many herbs are hardy. They can tolerate soil that is moderately dry. You want to keep an eye out for wilting when the soil is wet. Ideally, your herbs should make quick use of the water you give them. Saturated soil is not what you are after. Pay close attention to the coloration of the leaves on your herbs. Yellow leaves can be a sign of too much water, and so can black leaves. If you spot any mildew or fuzz on the herbs, too much moisture can be the problem.

Q

How do I harvest my herbs?

A

Trim back flowering sections before they bloom for healthier leaves. Prune new growth on young plants weekly to encourage a fuller mature plant. Snip herbs for harvest when they are just a few inches tall. Pruning back the herbs often means a larger, longer harvest. Cut the new growth back at least one per week, even if you are not using the herbs in recipes (see drying and freezing page if you do not want to waste your harvest). Long stems that are about to set flower buds should be trimmed off as they appear.

Q

What do I need to start an indoor herb garden?

A

Common tools needed for an indoor herb garden are: garden trowel, scissors for snipping, stones (optional). Materials for your herbs plants include seed, pots, potting soil, cactus potting soil (optional), pots or trays, fertilizer and a grow light if you do not have adequate sunlight of at least 6 hours per day for your plants.

Q

How do I prepare my containers for planting?

A

Choose large, deep containers with drainage holes to accommodate fast-growing herbs. Fill the container with potting mix leaving about ½ inch clear at the top. Use standard commercial potting soil for most herbs but blend in cactus potting mix for herbs native to the Mediterranean, such as thyme and oregano which prefer dryer soils.

Q

Can I put my indoor herb containers outside?

A

Yes! Move your potted herbs to the patio or deck when the weather warms in the spring and for a boost of sunshine.

Q

How do I know when my herbs need larger containers?

A

When roots begin to emerge through the drainage holes of its container, it is time to repot the herbs. Replace the potting mix; the organic material in the potting mix breaks down over time. Remove any plants with woody or thickened stems and replace them with new seeds or seedlings.

Q

Do herbs need fertilizer?

A

The short answer is yes. However, not all herbs have the same fertilizer needs. Herbs roughly fall into two groups. 1. Slow-growing herbs with small leaves or needles and fibrous, woody stems that are native to the mediterranean where they grow culinary lavender, month, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon and thyme. 2. Fast-growing herbs with larger, thinner leaves. These can be annuals such as basil, borage, cilantro, chervil and dill; bi-annual herbs such as parsley or perennials such as chives. Herbs in the first group generally need less fertilizer than herbs in the second group.

Q

What type of nutrients do herbs need?

A

Start out by planting herbs in healthy soil rich in organic matter. In addition, they will benefit from an organic complete, slow-release fertilizer containing equal amounts of macronutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. A slow-release fertilizer is especially important if your garden has sandy soil because nutrients wash out quickly. To give fast-growing herbs that you harvest often an extra boost, you can also apply fish emulsion, an organic fertilizer that is high in nitrogen, with an NPK ratio of 4-1-1 or 5-1-1.

Q

How often should I fertilize my herbs?

A

The frequency of fertilization follows the growth pattern of the herbs. In soil of average fertility, it is usually sufficient to apply a balanced fertilizer in the spring when they break dormancy, or when the new growing season starts. For other herbs, a light monthly application of a slow-release complete fertilizer should be enough – unless the leaves start to look yellow, which may be a sign of nitrogen deficiency. In that case, applying fish emulsion is a quick fix but before you reach for the fertilizer bottle, rule out that the yellowing of leaves is not caused by something else.

Q

How do I fertilize my herbs in a container?

A

Herbs grown in containers need fertilizer applications more often, because with frequent watering that container plants require, the fertilizer in the potting mix washes out more quickly. Just as with sandy soil, it is important to use slow-release fertilizer. The roots of container plants are in a confined space, unlike herbs grown in the garden or raised beds, which can lead to over fertilization if you are not careful. Organic fertilizers are recommended over synthetic which often contain a high level of salts that can build up in the container over time. To prevent this, it is best to use half the strength of the fertilizer amount specified on the label for any type of fertilizer.

Q

Is it possible to overfertilize herbs?

A

Adding too much fertilizer to herbs usually leads to an excess of nitrogen, which has undesirable results especially for slow-growing herbs. For basil and other thin-leaved herbs, the fast leaf growth induced by nitrogen is fine because you want your plants to be lush. For rosemary and other Mediterranean herbs however, rapid growth means that there is less concentration of essential oils causing the herbs to become less aromatic and have weaker flavor.

Q

How do I prepare garden soil before planting an herb garden?

A

Once you have picked the location for growing your herb garden, you will need to prepare the soil. If the soil is sandy or clay heavy, add plenty of compost. Even if your soil is in pretty good condition, working some compost into the soil will help provide nutrients to the herbs while they are growing.

Q

Can I harvest my herbs too often?

A

Many times, when a new gardener is starting an herb garden, they are afraid that harvesting the herbs frequently will hurt them. The opposite is true. Frequent harvesting of herbs will result in the herb plant producing more and more foliage, which increases the amount you are able to harvest. At the end of the season, you can dry or freeze your herb harvest to enjoy home grown herbs all year long.

Q

I don’t have a good sunny spot outdoors for my herb garden, what can I do?

A

If your yard is mostly shaded, there is not much you can do to change that, but you can pick shade friendly herbs. Parsley, sweet woodruff and mint are good examples of herbs that don’t require as much light. If you are growing plants in low light, manage your expectations. Your herbs will grow but will be slow and results less impressive.

Q

My container soil is staying wet, what do I do?

A

Choose a container that allow for water to drain. If you over water or if it rains too much a good pot will allow the water to flow to the bottom without soaking and rotting the roots of your plants. You can use rocks or pottery shards to fill the bottom of the container to help with drainage. This applies outdoors too. If your herbs constantly have wet feet, they won’t thrive. Either plan when planting your garden and add some sand for drainage or pick plants that don’t mind wet roots as much.

Q

My herbs plants are going to seed, why?

A

The short answer is you are not pruning enough. To prevent rapid growth and encourage a bushy habit, be sure to prune your herb plants regularly. The more you pick off your stems and leaves the longer your herb plant will remain in its production cycle. If you start to see flower heads, snip them right away. When you fail to cut back the plant, it is likely to go to seed and complete its lifecycle. Once that happens, many plants die back. Keep cutting and pinching back flowers to prevent this from happening.

Q

Should I throw away my seeds on their expiration date?

A

Seeds do not have an expiration date, rather they are a sell by date just like food. The dates on seed packages are guidelines to help you know when your seeds are getting old, but it does not mean you need to toss them. Every plant is different. Some seeds last longer than others. Most seeds, if kept cool and dry, will last 2 – 3 years. If you are unsure test them out by growing microgreens.

ABOUT
FAQ’s

Herb Specifications

SEASON

Perennial

USDA ZONES

5 - 11

HEIGHT

12 - 24 inches

BLOOM SEASON

Late spring to mid summer

BLOOM COLOR

White

ENVIRONMENT

Partial shade

SOIL TYPE

Varying soil types as long as they are saturated, pH 6.5 - 7.5

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

50 - 60F

AVERAGE GERM TIME

7 - 14 days

LIGHT REQUIRED

No

DEPTH

1/4 inch

SOWING RATE

15 - 20 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination

PLANT SPACING

9 - 12 inches

Watercress (Nasturtium Officinale) - Watercress seeds are grown for both a culinary and medicinal herb. It is a succulent, leafy plant that thrives in marshes, bogs and water gardens. The lobed leaves can be eaten raw, cooked or dried. They have a pungent flavor and are crisp. It needs to be harvested before the buds appear as the leaves turn bitter after flowering. It is a fast-growing plant that prefers partial shade.

Bright white blooms

Watercress produces white flowers in mid-summer which are very attractive to bees and the plants are highly ornamental in home ponds.

herb plant watercress

Herb seed | watercress

How to grow

How To Grow Watercress From Seed: Start seeds for an indoor herb garden. Place the containers in a tray of water and keep the water constantly supplied. Fluorescent lamps or growing lights are needed. The seeds can be started indoors 6 weeks before the last expected frost and then transplanted outdoors. The ideal setting is along a pond or stream bank.

  • Sowing Rate: 15 - 20 seeds per plant
  • Average Germ Time: 7 - 14 days
  • Keep moist until germination
  • Attracts bees and birds
  • Depth: 1/4 inch
watercress seeds

Plant Specifications

As a medicinal herb, it has long been used to treat sore throats and sinus congestion. It is very rich in vitamins and minerals and in alternative medicine, it is used for a wide variety of ailments. Some other common names that watercress is called are: water rocket, water radish, and hedge mustard. It is in the mustard family.

  • Height: 12 - 24 inches
  • USDA Zones: 5 - 11
  • Season: Perennial

Common Questions

Q

Which herbs can thrive in the kitchen?

A

Not all herbs are suitable for indoor growth. Herbs with woody, bushy growth, like rosemary are too large for indoor herb gardens. Consider other more suitable herbs for an indoor kitchen garden, such as chives, oregano, thyme, dill, mint, basil, cilantro, sage and savory. Each herb has specific growing needs, so ensure to provide the right amount of light, humidity, and air circulation. If using a single large container, ensure that all plants require similar amounts of sunlight and water. For instance, chives and cilantro may not need as much sunlight as dill and oregano.

Q

What are good companion plants for herb gardens?

A

Pairing herbs based on watering requirements, like planting lavender with thyme or basil with chives, is ideal for maintaining the health of both plants. Avoid companion planting with catnip, lemon balm and mint as they should be grown in separate pots due to their rapid spreading nature that can overtake other plants in your indoor herb garden.

Q

When do I establish an indoor herb garden?

A

Create a kitchen herb garden by propagating cuttings from your outdoor plants as the weather cools in the fall. If you opt to sow your indoor herb garden from purchased seeds, begin a few weeks before the anticipated first frost of the season. Most herbs can be harvested within a few weeks, so there is no need to plant too far in advance.

Q

Do kitchen herbs need full sun?

A

Most herbs need 6 hours of sunlight a day to thrive. If you do not have this type of light available in your kitchen, consider a grow light that will run 14-16 hours per day 6 to 12 inches above your plants. NOTE: Rotate herbs periodically when grown in windows to let each part of the plant receive sunlight.

Q

What time of year should you plant herbs?

A

Herbs grown in indoor gardens can be planted any time of year. Many gardeners prefer to grow their herbs outdoors during the summer growing season, and then move them to their indoor garden before the first frost of fall. If you prefer to start your seeds outdoors, you will need to wait until after danger of frost in the spring or start your seeds indoors 6 -8 weeks before last frost and transplant in your garden after danger of frost.

Q

Do herbs come back every year?

A

Perennial herbs will come back each year when planted in the correct zone or grown indoors during the cold winter months. Popular perennial herbs are oregano, parsley, sage, fennel, chives, lavender, thyme and mint varieties.

Q

How do I know when my herbs need watered?

A

Allow the soil to dry out just slightly before watering your herbs again. Give your indoor herb garden a dose of diluted water-soluble fertilizer every 2 weeks or so. Too much food will compromise the taste of the herbs. It is also beneficial to provide adequate humidity. If the indoor air is especially dry – which is often the case in regions with cold winters. Set the herbs pots on trays of stones. Fill the trays with water but keep the level below the drainage holes of your pots.

Q

When do I water my outdoor herb garden?

A

Different herb plants will need different amounts of water so keep this in mind when planting your garden and keep similar plants together to simplify watering. Watering is best done in the early morning hours when temperatures are cooler. Many herbs are hardy. They can tolerate soil that is moderately dry. You want to keep an eye out for wilting when the soil is wet. Ideally, your herbs should make quick use of the water you give them. Saturated soil is not what you are after. Pay close attention to the coloration of the leaves on your herbs. Yellow leaves can be a sign of too much water, and so can black leaves. If you spot any mildew or fuzz on the herbs, too much moisture can be the problem.

Q

How do I harvest my herbs?

A

Trim back flowering sections before they bloom for healthier leaves. Prune new growth on young plants weekly to encourage a fuller mature plant. Snip herbs for harvest when they are just a few inches tall. Pruning back the herbs often means a larger, longer harvest. Cut the new growth back at least one per week, even if you are not using the herbs in recipes (see drying and freezing page if you do not want to waste your harvest). Long stems that are about to set flower buds should be trimmed off as they appear.

Q

What do I need to start an indoor herb garden?

A

Common tools needed for an indoor herb garden are: garden trowel, scissors for snipping, stones (optional). Materials for your herbs plants include seed, pots, potting soil, cactus potting soil (optional), pots or trays, fertilizer and a grow light if you do not have adequate sunlight of at least 6 hours per day for your plants.

Q

How do I prepare my containers for planting?

A

Choose large, deep containers with drainage holes to accommodate fast-growing herbs. Fill the container with potting mix leaving about ½ inch clear at the top. Use standard commercial potting soil for most herbs but blend in cactus potting mix for herbs native to the Mediterranean, such as thyme and oregano which prefer dryer soils.

Q

Can I put my indoor herb containers outside?

A

Yes! Move your potted herbs to the patio or deck when the weather warms in the spring and for a boost of sunshine.

Q

How do I know when my herbs need larger containers?

A

When roots begin to emerge through the drainage holes of its container, it is time to repot the herbs. Replace the potting mix; the organic material in the potting mix breaks down over time. Remove any plants with woody or thickened stems and replace them with new seeds or seedlings.

Q

Do herbs need fertilizer?

A

The short answer is yes. However, not all herbs have the same fertilizer needs. Herbs roughly fall into two groups. 1. Slow-growing herbs with small leaves or needles and fibrous, woody stems that are native to the mediterranean where they grow culinary lavender, month, marjoram, oregano, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon and thyme. 2. Fast-growing herbs with larger, thinner leaves. These can be annuals such as basil, borage, cilantro, chervil and dill; bi-annual herbs such as parsley or perennials such as chives. Herbs in the first group generally need less fertilizer than herbs in the second group.

Q

What type of nutrients do herbs need?

A

Start out by planting herbs in healthy soil rich in organic matter. In addition, they will benefit from an organic complete, slow-release fertilizer containing equal amounts of macronutrients nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. A slow-release fertilizer is especially important if your garden has sandy soil because nutrients wash out quickly. To give fast-growing herbs that you harvest often an extra boost, you can also apply fish emulsion, an organic fertilizer that is high in nitrogen, with an NPK ratio of 4-1-1 or 5-1-1.

Q

How often should I fertilize my herbs?

A

The frequency of fertilization follows the growth pattern of the herbs. In soil of average fertility, it is usually sufficient to apply a balanced fertilizer in the spring when they break dormancy, or when the new growing season starts. For other herbs, a light monthly application of a slow-release complete fertilizer should be enough – unless the leaves start to look yellow, which may be a sign of nitrogen deficiency. In that case, applying fish emulsion is a quick fix but before you reach for the fertilizer bottle, rule out that the yellowing of leaves is not caused by something else.

Q

How do I fertilize my herbs in a container?

A

Herbs grown in containers need fertilizer applications more often, because with frequent watering that container plants require, the fertilizer in the potting mix washes out more quickly. Just as with sandy soil, it is important to use slow-release fertilizer. The roots of container plants are in a confined space, unlike herbs grown in the garden or raised beds, which can lead to over fertilization if you are not careful. Organic fertilizers are recommended over synthetic which often contain a high level of salts that can build up in the container over time. To prevent this, it is best to use half the strength of the fertilizer amount specified on the label for any type of fertilizer.

Q

Is it possible to overfertilize herbs?

A

Adding too much fertilizer to herbs usually leads to an excess of nitrogen, which has undesirable results especially for slow-growing herbs. For basil and other thin-leaved herbs, the fast leaf growth induced by nitrogen is fine because you want your plants to be lush. For rosemary and other Mediterranean herbs however, rapid growth means that there is less concentration of essential oils causing the herbs to become less aromatic and have weaker flavor.

Q

How do I prepare garden soil before planting an herb garden?

A

Once you have picked the location for growing your herb garden, you will need to prepare the soil. If the soil is sandy or clay heavy, add plenty of compost. Even if your soil is in pretty good condition, working some compost into the soil will help provide nutrients to the herbs while they are growing.

Q

Can I harvest my herbs too often?

A

Many times, when a new gardener is starting an herb garden, they are afraid that harvesting the herbs frequently will hurt them. The opposite is true. Frequent harvesting of herbs will result in the herb plant producing more and more foliage, which increases the amount you are able to harvest. At the end of the season, you can dry or freeze your herb harvest to enjoy home grown herbs all year long.

Q

I don’t have a good sunny spot outdoors for my herb garden, what can I do?

A

If your yard is mostly shaded, there is not much you can do to change that, but you can pick shade friendly herbs. Parsley, sweet woodruff and mint are good examples of herbs that don’t require as much light. If you are growing plants in low light, manage your expectations. Your herbs will grow but will be slow and results less impressive.

Q

My container soil is staying wet, what do I do?

A

Choose a container that allow for water to drain. If you over water or if it rains too much a good pot will allow the water to flow to the bottom without soaking and rotting the roots of your plants. You can use rocks or pottery shards to fill the bottom of the container to help with drainage. This applies outdoors too. If your herbs constantly have wet feet, they won’t thrive. Either plan when planting your garden and add some sand for drainage or pick plants that don’t mind wet roots as much.

Q

My herbs plants are going to seed, why?

A

The short answer is you are not pruning enough. To prevent rapid growth and encourage a bushy habit, be sure to prune your herb plants regularly. The more you pick off your stems and leaves the longer your herb plant will remain in its production cycle. If you start to see flower heads, snip them right away. When you fail to cut back the plant, it is likely to go to seed and complete its lifecycle. Once that happens, many plants die back. Keep cutting and pinching back flowers to prevent this from happening.

Q

Should I throw away my seeds on their expiration date?

A

Seeds do not have an expiration date, rather they are a sell by date just like food. The dates on seed packages are guidelines to help you know when your seeds are getting old, but it does not mean you need to toss them. Every plant is different. Some seeds last longer than others. Most seeds, if kept cool and dry, will last 2 – 3 years. If you are unsure test them out by growing microgreens.

ABOUT

Herb Specifications

SEASON

Biennial

USDA ZONES

2 - 10

HEIGHT

60 inches

BLOOM SEASON

Late spring to mid summer

BLOOM COLOR

Purple

ENVIRONMENT

Full sun to partial shade

SOIL TYPE

Well drained, moist soils

DEER RESISTANT

Yes

LATIN NAME

Arctium Lappa

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

Sow at Max 41F, germination irregular often several months

AVERAGE GERM TIME

7 - 14 days

LIGHT REQUIRED

Yes

DEPTH

1/4 inch

SOWING RATE

2 - 3 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination

PLANT SPACING

36 - 48 inches

Burdock (Arctium Lappa) - Burdock, or also called Great Burdock, is a robust biennial herb plant grown from herb seeds with long-stalked leaves. The Great Burdock herb is a nutritious vegetable and medicinal herb used as a remedy for measles, arthritis, tonsillitis, viruses like colds, throat pain, and as a diuretic. In modern times, Burdock is also used in oncology and to treat many other serious health problems. Great Burdock plant stalks are cooked like celery. The Burdock root is eaten raw or cooked like parsnips. Great Burdock herb seeds can be sprouted.

How To Grow Great Burdock: Start Burdock seeds directly outdoors as soon in the spring as the soil can be prepared. Cover the Great Burdock seeds with light soil and lightly tamp down. Burdock plants grow along roadsides, in open fields, at the edges of woods, and anywhere ground has been disturbed just as most thistles would. Because it is a biennial, the first year Burdock only forms a cluster of large leaves. The large leaves grow from a carrot-like root that can penetrate over two feet into the ground. It is this Burdock root that is most often used in herbal medicine. After a year of growth, Burdock puts forth a branched stalk with smaller leaves and, in the late summer, purple-pink flowers. In autumn, these flowers are replaced by round brown burrs that persist into the winter. The herb seeds contained in these burrs are also used medicinally.

ABOUT

Herb Specifications

SEASON

Perennial

USDA ZONES

3 - 7

HEIGHT

16 - 24 inches

BLOOM SEASON

Mid summer to early fall

BLOOM COLOR

Green

ENVIRONMENT

Full sun to partial shade

SOIL TYPE

Rich, well-drained soil, pH 5.6 - 6.5

DEER RESISTANT

Yes

LATIN NAME

Rumex Acetosa

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

68F

AVERAGE GERM TIME

7 - 14 days

LIGHT REQUIRED

Yes

DEPTH

1/4 inch

SOWING RATE

3 - 4 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination

PLANT SPACING

9 - 12 inches

Garden Sorrel (Rumex Acetosa) - Garden Sorrel is a becoming more well-known and used in the United States as a culinary herb, and it easily grow from Sorrel seeds. It comes from Europe and has been used there for centuries. Its use dates back to the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. This variety, Green de Belleville, has green arrow-shaped leaves that have a slightly acidic taste and is slower to bolt than other varieties. When the leaves are eaten fresh and added to salads or a sandwich, they add a little zest and tang. The herb leaves can also be chopped or shredded and added to soups for flavoring. Garden Sorrel is also known as Common Sorrel, English Sorrel and simply Sorrel.

Common Sorrel herb has historically been used as a medicinal herb. It has been used to treat fevers and scurvy. The juice from the leaves is used to calm itchy skin rashes and ringworm. English Sorrel herb is a highly nutritious herb. It is high in vitamin A, vitamin C and potassium.

How To Grow Sorrel From Herb Seeds: Start the Sorrel seeds directly outdoors after frost season has passed. Prepare a seedbed that is located in full sun or partial shade. Add organic matter to the soil. Cover the herb seeds lightly with soil. Sorrel seedlings can establish quickly, and the leaves can be harvested any time after the first couple of months of spring growth. When flower stalks emerge cut them back. Sorrel herb plants should be divided every 3- 5 years and replanted.

ABOUT

Herb Specifications

SEASON

Annual

USDA ZONES

5 - 11

HEIGHT

48 inches

BLOOM SEASON

Late spring to mid summer

BLOOM COLOR

White

ENVIRONMENT

Full sun

SOIL TYPE

pH 6.0 - 8.0

DEER RESISTANT

No

LATIN NAME

Abelmoschus Esculentus

Planting Directions

TEMPERATURE

70F

AVERAGE GERM TIME

10 - 14 days

LIGHT REQUIRED

Yes

DEPTH

1/2 - 1 inch

SOWING RATE

1 - 2 seeds per plant

MOISTURE

Keep seeds moist until germination

PLANT SPACING

18 - 36 inches

Okra - Clemson Spineless (Abelmoschus Esculentus) - Grow Okra seeds for this edible and ornamental herb plant. The lovely flowers are hibiscus-like and creamy white in color. This variety of Okra has deep green, ribbed, spineless pods. Pick the pods young while they are still tender. A test for tenderness is to snap off the end of a pod. If it snaps, it has not become tough and fibrous yet and should still be good for eating. Okra pods are excellent for use in soups, stews, and is excellent fried. Okra plants can reach 48 inches or more in height, or the herb plants can be topped and grown shorter. If given room to branch out, Okra herb plants can spread 36 inches in width. The Okra herb is extremely drought and heat resistant and a popular herb or vegetable in many countries with difficult growing conditions. Okra is a heat lover and grows best when temperatures reach 80 to 90 degrees

How To Grow Okra From Herb Seeds: Okra seeds are large and easy to plant. Some herb gardeners like to pre-soak their Okra seeds the night before planting. Okra herb seeds can be directly sown in the herb garden or started indoors and transplanted. Starting seedlings in peat pots will lessen transplant shock. Start herb seeds indoors 6 - 8 weeks before transplant date.

Okra plants are not pleasant to touch. Whether the spines are pronounced or hair-like, they are scratchy and irritating. Gloves and long sleeves help. It is also easier to harvest with a pruner, rather than pulling and getting the spines in your fingers.